Friday Morning Coffee Break: Tools of the Trade “Hario Drip Kettle”

I love the holidays. I get presents, I give presents, and I get to drink some damn fine coffee.

Hario Buono Coffee Kettle

This year my ladyfriend was amazing. She bought me stuff to help build my coffee crap craft collection. On Christmas I was given a Hario Buono Coffee Drip Kettle. It is stylish, metallic, and looks like a beehive. It is sexy, gives me complete control over my water pour and just looks elegant on the counter. Being able to look like a piece of art is important when something takes up counter space. You don’t want your house to look like a mess. You want it to look like an architects/designers wet dream full of tres chic designs and shapes. This pot is made in Japan. Along with the pour over and coffee sock, I can say that Japan’s coffee renaissance has been improving the craft coffee scene for all.

What I like about the Hario kettle is, like I said before, control. When you are making coffee there are many variables that you are working with. Water quality, water temperature, grind of coffee, quantity of coffee, water flow, filtration, coffee age, brew time, etc. etc. The list is enormous. But what the Hario does is it allows you to control at least a few variables. Namely water heat and water flow. Now heat you are constantly losing from when you pull the water off of a heating element but the bee hive design of the Hario allows for longer heat retention in the pot maintaining a more consistent near boiling temperature.

The Hario also lets you control the amount of water that you pour onto the grounds. This controlling of water allows you to 1. Fully saturate the grounds during the blooming stage 2. Fill up your coffee to the desired level/weight 3. Control the pour so that you are not over extracting your coffee. Think of coffee beans like a peanut M&M. On the outside layer is the color which when extracted gives coffee it’s nice brown/red hue. Inside of that is the chocolate, all of the great flavors that you like. Finally there is the peanut. In an M&M it is good, but in coffee that is the bitter bland part that we don’t want to pull into the actual coffee liquid. The Hario allows to properly extract the good parts of the coffee and leave the bad parts in.

*I should not here that skill is still required to not pull in the peanut, but the Hario helps.

When we think about over extracting, a lot of manual brewers are gravity based. Meaning that when you pour the water over the coffee, the liquid is pulled down. The water will also look for the path of least resistance  and if the coffee grounds have an opening say on the edge of a pour-over, than that is where the coffee will go. Or the water will direct itself to the edge of the pour over thus over extracting the outside grounds and under extracting the inside.

The science is too difficult and too long to explain here so I will do that at a later date but needless to say. This is one of the best gifts I ever received. I really love it and love my ladyfriend for it.

You can purchase the Hario Drip Kettle here.

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